Author Topic: Fundamental question about Mind!  (Read 195581 times)

Hari

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Re: Fundamental question about Mind!
« Reply #1695 on: March 11, 2013, 02:47:44 PM »
The day will come when my body will lie upon a white sheet neatly tucked under four corners of a mattress located in a hospital busily occupied with the living and the dying.  At a certain moment, a doctor will determine that my brain has ceased to function and that, for all intents and purposes, my life has stopped.

When that happens, do not attempt to instill artificial life into my body by the use of a machine.  And don't call this my deathbed.  Let it be called the Bed of Life, and let my body be taken from it to help others lead fuller lives.

Give my sight to the man who has never seen a sunrise, a baby's face or love in the eyes of a woman.  Give my heart to a person whose own heart has caused nothing but endless days of pain.

Give my blood to the teenager who was pulled from the wreckage of his car, so that he might live to see his grandchildren play.  Give my kidneys to one who depends on a machine to exist.  Take my bones, every muscle, every fiber and nerve in my body, and find a way to make a crippled child walk.

Explore every corner of my brain.  Take my cells, if necessary, and let them grow so that, someday, a speechless boy will shout at the crack of a bat, and a deaf girl will hear the sound of rain against her window.

Burn what is left of me and scatter the ashes to the winds to help the flowers grow.  If you must bury something, let it be my faults, my weaknesses and all prejudice against my fellow man.

If, by chance, you wish to remember me, do it with a kind deed or word to someone who needs you.  If you do all I have asked, I will live forever.


- WRITTEN BY ROBERT N. TEST -
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Hari

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Sage Narada explains bhakti
« Reply #1696 on: March 11, 2013, 03:17:48 PM »
"That is highest love, that is like Amrit, finding which, a person becomes perfect, becomes immortal, becomes satisfied, finding which, he desires nothing more, neither grieves, nor hates, neither engages and not gets enthusiastic about any thing else, having known which, he becomes as if drugged, lost as if, stunned, surprised, and dwells in his own self. By nature bhakti is free of desire, possessing the nature of unconcern towards worldly affairs, exclusive devotion toward That (God), and unconcern toward any thing that contradicts it, giving up of other shelters, and exclusively taking the shelter of That (God). Even when interacting with this world, or conducting worldly affairs, living according to That (God), and having unconcern toward any thing that contradicts That (God)."
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Hari

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Re: Fundamental question about Mind!
« Reply #1697 on: March 11, 2013, 03:43:56 PM »
"When you realize how perfect everything is you will tilt your head back and laugh at the sky"

Lord Buddha
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Hari

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Re: Fundamental question about Mind!
« Reply #1698 on: March 11, 2013, 09:05:58 PM »
"Expectation is the root of all heartache."

- W. Shakespeare -
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Ravi.N

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Re: Fundamental question about Mind!
« Reply #1699 on: March 12, 2013, 06:31:46 AM »
Hari/Friends,

Quote
What you take to be the ‘I’ in the ‘I am’ is not you. To know that your are is natural, to know what you are is the result of much investigation. You will have to explore the entire field of consciousness and go beyond it. For this you must find the right teacher and create the conditions needed for discovery. Generally speaking, there are two ways: external and internal. Either you live with somebody who knows the Truth and submit yourself entirely to his guiding and molding influence, or you seek the inner guide and follow the inner light wherever it takes you. In both cases your personal desires and fears must be disregarded. You learn either by proximity or by investigation, the passive or the active way. You either let yourself be carried by the river of life and love represented by your Guru, or you make your own efforts, guided by your inner star. In both cases you must move on, you must be earnest

Wonderful saying of Maharaj.Thanks very much.

Namaskar.

Hari

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The Essence of Madhvacharya's philosophy
« Reply #1700 on: March 12, 2013, 12:11:46 PM »
The Essence of Madhva's philosophy

Madhva's line of thought gave a new turn to the tradition of Indian Philosophy. Madhva's philosophy also goes by the name tatva vāda, or pluralism, in early Sanskrit literature. In later times, when the relationship between Īśvara, or God and jīva, or soul was the main point of conflict among the schools of philosophy, it came to be called the ' Dvaita-mata ' or 'dualistic school', and is classically placed in opposition to Śaṅkara's Advaita. (Sharma 1994, p. 372)
Epistemology

Madhva accepts three sources of knowledge: Pratyakṣa or perception, Anumāna or inference and Śabda (pramāṇa) or testimony, and holds that Īśvara can only be known through the scriptures. (Sharma 1994, pp. 372–3)
Interpretation of the Vedas

For Madhva, like for the Mīmāṃsakas, the Vedas are apauruṣeya or unauthored. Their truth is both eternal and uncontradictory, and encompasses all of its parts (i.e. the saṃhitas, brāhmaņas, āraņyakās and upanișads). However, his interpretation of the Veda is such as to discover within the corpus statements of the fivefold difference.
Metaphysics

According to Madhva there are primarily two tatvas or categories of reality—svatantra tatva (independent reality) and asvantantra tatva (dependent reality). Broadly, Īśvara as creator of the universe is the independent reality, and the created universe is the dependent reality. The created universe consists of jīva and matter. Jīvas are sentient and matter is non-sentient.

Madhva further enumerates the difference between dependent and independent reality as a fivefold division between Īśvara, jīva and matter. These differences are: (1) Between matter and matter; (2) Between matter and jīva; (3) Between matter and Īśvara; (4) Between jīva and jīva; and (5) Between jīva and Īśvara. This difference is neither temporary nor merely practical; it is an invariable and natural property of everything. For such is the law of nature: One is not two; two is not one. There is no object like another.

There is no jīva like another. No man's nature is like that of another. Underlying everything and every individual person, there is a unique individuality or speciality. The sea is full; the tank is full; even water-pots may be full (of water). But that fullness is not identical in all these. The volume varies according to the variation in size. Everything is full, yet each fullness is different. In fact, even in liberated jīvas, the difference prevails such that the degree of knowledge and enjoyment of bliss of each soul varies. (Sharma 1994, p. 372)
Nature of the World

Madhva sees the world as five-faceted: five elements, five elemental essences, five sheaths, five sense-organs etc. That is why it is designated as pra-pañca or a 'perfect pentad' in Sanskrit. In this pentad, the principle of Prana there is the fivefold division of prāņa, apāna, vyāna, udāna and samāna. Moreover, it is being controlled all the time by God who also assumes five forms, viz. Aniruddha, Pradyumna, Saṇkaraṣaṇa, Vāsudeva and Nārāyaṇa. The world is permanent and is a fallen state for the jīva, which is away from its place of true happiness, namely in the presence of Īśvara. The world is the līla or sport of Īśvara, and so creation isn't to be shunned. Rather it should be enjoyed in a detached way.

Nature of the Soul

There are an infinite number of atomic, eternally existing jīvas. Madhva compares the relationship of the jīva to Īśvara with the analogy of a thing (bimba) and its reflection (pratibimba): if Īśvara be the statue, the jīvas are his reflection. The reflection is always dependent on the original; it can never become identical with it. Like jīvas, the inanimate substances too that go into the creative apparatus of the universe are innumerable. Each jīva is numerically and qualitatively non-identical to every other and the variety of qualitative differentiation is infinite. The nature of the jīva is to be further liable to be caught up in the world. The jīva, which is at the center in the triple categories of Īśvara–jīva–matter, becomes involved in the meshes of [[samsara]], or bondage when it leans toward matter; it becomes liberated if it leans toward Īśvara, the essence of whom is reflected in its capacity for knowledge and consciousness.

Nature of God

Madhva's theology is a form of Vaishnavism. According to Madhva, Nārāyaṇa alone is the supreme independent godhead. The entire Vedic corpus hymns only his praise; the names of deities invoked therein, such as Agni, Indra and Varuṇa are but various epithets of Viṣṇu. Monotheism alone is thus the quintessence of Vedic literature and not polytheism.

Though Īśvara is one, the divine beings are many. These divine beings are not God. They are only jīvas that have realized God and risen to a high state by acquiring [[siddhi]] or divine power. These siddhas or realized adepts can serve as gurus to guide the soul who is still a religious seeker.

Īśvara is the creator of the world, an omniscient, omnipotent, omnibenevolent, just and wholly transcendent being. Madhva has Īśvara straddle various contradictions in the description of Brahman by semantic interpretation. For example, for the notion that "Īśvara both has forms and is formless, and is both qualified and unqualified," Madhva explains it in the following way. Īśvara is endowed with forms because he has a body of knowledge and bliss, but is formless because he has no body that can be circumscribed by a finite mind. Īśvara is qualified because he possesses the six qualities of omniscience (Jñāna), sovereignty (Aiśvarya), omnipotence (Śakti), endurance, or the capacity to support everything by will and without any fatigue (Bala), vigour, or the power to retain immateriality as the supreme being in spite of being the material cause of mutable creations (Vīrya) and splendour, or self-sufficiency and the capacity to overpower everything by his spiritual effulgence (Tejas) (Tapasyananda 1991), but unqualified because he is entirely free of material adjuncts. Īśvara chooses to save some souls while condemning others to eternal existence within saṃsāra. (Sharma 1994, p. 373)

Viṣṇu has Lakṣmī for his consort and she is co-extensive and eternal like him, but is slightly inferior to him. Lakṣmī is ever-liberated and has a divine body and is the Power of God. (Sharma 1994, p. 373)

Nature of Liberation

Mukti, or liberation, does not mean the cessation of an illusory world. Rather, the world is real, and liberation is the lack of attachment to the world. In samsāra, the jīva, being unaware of its power of self-consciousness, is ignorant of its true nature as a reflection of Īśvara, becomes a tool in the hands of matter, searching in vain for truth. In the state of liberation, material nature is conquered, and consciousness of Īśvara fills the soul. The world is realized as a dependent reality and therefore as 'untrue' in the sense of being the lesser reality.

Means to Liberation

The only way for the jīva to escape the world is divine grace, which can only be gained through selfless devotional service to God, or [[bhakti]]. (Sharma 1994, p. 373)

Perfection of the jīva

The all-round and complete development of one's special personality is the goal of human life. Human life is a practical workshop that helps the individual soul to attain the perfect development of his personality and strive toward liberation.

The development of an individual takes place strictly in accordance with his inner nature. The environmental factors only help manifest what is already rooted in one's inner nature. Inner nature rooted firmly in the jiva from time immemorial. No amount of effort can alter its course. Madhva uses the theory of the three guṇas to explain the varying degrees of perfection in individual souls. A sāttvika jīva cannot become a tāmasa. Nor can a tāmasa turn into a sāttvika. One's attainment of perfection is nothing but a complete manifestation of one's unique individual nature.

The Four Varnas

The idea of cāturvarņya or the classification system expounded by Kṛṣṇa in the [[Bhagavad Gīta]] forms the social corollary to the view of human perfection, according Madhva. The Gīta's idea of "four colours" is quite distinct from the idea of "four castes" prevalent today. It is an idea that relates only to the soul's inmost nature or personality-trait. The true colour of the jīva needs to be discovered. That indeed is a right social order.

In such a social order, the son of a labourer (śūdra) may be a priest (brāhmaņa); on the contrary, a brāhmaņa's son may also be a śūdra. This is because varṇa is not something which is transmitted hereditarily—it is something quite personal, determined by the individual's own personality traits.

Only one who knows God can know the secret of the universe. It is impossible to know the universe completely by scientific research into matter. Hence one should know God Himself. It is only by knowing the root that one can tackle a tree. This indeed is the pathway of knowledge (Jnanayoga).

The principle that unites the soul to God like a thread is called prana-tattva or the "vital principle". It is the one principle that embodies all souls and is also termed "jivottama-tattva" or the "principle of perfect jiva-hood". Acharya says about himself that it is an aspect of this supreme principle that incarnated itself in human form as Madhva in order to lay bare the Supreme Truth.

The pathway of Jnana-yoga or knowledge supreme is not opposed to Karma or action. The very dichotomy that the pathway of action is for the ignorant, while that of knowledge is for the adept, is absurd.

Knowledge without action is an impractical intellectual exercise. Action without knowledge is but blind orthodoxy. Knowledge is necessary; knowledge-full action too is necessary. At the same time, an understanding of God's infinite glory is equally necessary.

Having understood God's greatness, it is necessary to love him devotedly. The world also deserves to be lived, since the wonderful universe is just His creation in sport (lila)".

Denying the world is as good as denying God's own infinite greatness. We should all dedicate ourselves to our duty in the following spirit: "We are all subjects in the kingdom of God; rendering assistance to those who are in distress is the tax we owe to God Himself, our king".

Such an integral synthesis of the pathways of knowledge, action and devotion becomes a perfect pathway for one's life.

The physical eye is not enough for the development of knowledge. The inner eye has to be opened; one has to turn inward.

There are only two ways in which that goal can be realized; one is direct personal experience; and the other is the word of wisdom bequeathed to us by sages who were "seers" of the Veda. Their word is a torch to illumine our way. In the light of that torch and along that way alone we should walk on and discover Truth.

Thus when both the word of scripture and our own immediate experience coincide, it becomes the highest criterion confirming our conviction.

In order to achieve it, a continuous process of hearing, cogitating and realization of the scriptures is called for. Not even scriptural statement is to be accepted if it is against one's own conscience.

An awakened conscience can discover the integral unity underlying all Vedic statements. It is in order to demonstrate this synthetic essence of the Vedas that the Brahmasutras, Bharata, Pancharatra and Puranas have been written. These alone are primary authorities.

Texts of smrti (moral code), written by sages like Manu, are acceptable as authorities only when they are in conformity with the essential message of the Veda. They are not ultimate authorities.

Another means of valid knowledge besides perception and scripture is inference or reasoning. Although it is an instrument of valid knowledge, it is not an independent instrument. Hence it is spoken of only as "anu-mana" (anusaari pramana) or 'ancillary instrument of knowledge'; it can be developed only as a supplementary instrument to the other two, i.e., perception and scripture.

It is important to note that in supra-sensory matters, nothing can be established by inference or reasoning independently. For, anything one desires can be established by reasoning. Those who do not possess this awareness can establish nothing by the strength of their reasoning. Therefore in regard to supra-sensory facts and especially, in regard to God, there is no use in one's surrendering oneself to reasoning.

One should surrender oneself only to God. One should surrender oneself to the voice of hoary sages and wise men who realized God; that is to say, to the Vedic words. One should know through word of sages, and having known, one should experience it; having experienced, one should see; having seen, one should succeed; having succeeded, one should gain.

And for that, one should surrender oneself to God; one should know through surrender; and knowing, one should again surrender.

This awareness is the key to bliss.
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Hari

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Re: Fundamental question about Mind!
« Reply #1701 on: March 12, 2013, 04:41:41 PM »
"Unless you make tremendous efforts, you will not be convinced that effort will take you nowhere. The self is so self-confident that unless it is totally discouraged it will not give up. Mere verbal conviction is not enough. Hard facts alone can show the absolute nothingness of the self-image."

- Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj -
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Jewell

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Re: Fundamental question about Mind!
« Reply #1702 on: March 12, 2013, 04:55:02 PM »
Dear Hari,

So true. We dont want to let go until we are totally discouraged. And its really hard to discourage someone who is very persistent and have undying hope. Our best qualities seem to be our very enemy in the end. There is nothing for what ego wont try to hold. But,in the end,all must go. In one way or another. When 'we hit on iron wall,we' give up eventualy. :) When there is really not important what 'we' think anyway.

Thank You Very much!

With love and prayers,
Love

Hari

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Re: Fundamental question about Mind!
« Reply #1703 on: March 12, 2013, 04:59:43 PM »
Dear Hari,

So true. We dont want to let go until we are totally discouraged. And its really hard to discourage someone who is very persistent and have undying hope. Our best qualities seem to be our very enemy in the end. There is nothing for what ego wont try to hold. But,in the end,all must go. In one way or another. When 'we hit on iron wall,we' give up eventualy. :) When there is really not important what 'we' think anyway.

Thank You Very much!

With love and prayers,

Do you remember what we were talking about yesterday about attachments? This is why I told you that I think that the more we do things which we like the more our ego becomes more stronger and more resistant to surrender. The more it love the world and its objects the more harder is its annihilation (by surrender and abiding in the Self). Very sad news and facts but I think - true. :)
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Jewell

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Re: Fundamental question about Mind!
« Reply #1704 on: March 12, 2013, 05:21:08 PM »
Yes. Thats why i mentioned iron wall. True,the more we do things with attachment. But there are also many things in spiritual field,many ideas on which ego attaches too. Well,it attaches on anything it can use actually. I was thinking on that. For me that is worst. Coz i can be unattached more to things,and people from simple reason,i can see the reason of my attachment. It is always obvious it is ego. Its going on like broken reccord. There is always some patern behind it. Butit is hard to let go the hope for realisation. I think that must be more determination,it is better then hope. Sure,i am talking about something after years of sadhana. Hope is essential all the way. It is hard to let go ides which came in this spiritual field.
Sure we must be unattached. It is a must,you are right. Yes,sad news. :) But,when i think about all headashe it gave us...it is not so sad.
Love

Hari

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Re: Fundamental question about Mind!
« Reply #1705 on: March 12, 2013, 05:24:24 PM »
"But it is hard to let go the hope for realisation."

Yes. Very, very hard. But hoping for realization means that now you believe that you are bound which is belief destructive enough for Self-realization. Everything is just a very strange game of the mind. :)
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Jewell

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Re: Fundamental question about Mind!
« Reply #1706 on: March 12, 2013, 05:28:11 PM »
Yes,so true. Silly mind. Or should i say stupid. Even not mind,but what we make from it. A mess.
Love

Hari

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Re: Fundamental question about Mind!
« Reply #1707 on: March 12, 2013, 05:33:10 PM »
"You may turn your bone to fuel, your flesh to meat, letting them roast and sizzle in the gold-red blaze of severe austerities. But unless your heart melts in love's sweet ecstasy, you never can possess my Lord Siva, my treasure-trove."

- Tirumantiram 272 -

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Hari

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Re: Fundamental question about Mind!
« Reply #1708 on: March 12, 2013, 05:45:11 PM »
Divine Lord bless me with your love

Divine Lord bless me with Your love,
divine Lord bless me so that I may lie at Your feet,
Thou divine feet emits the glow of eternal joy.
Divine Lord be my guide.
Divine Lord forgive my ignorance,
divine Lord extend Your blessings
so that I may bathe in Your glorious light.

Divine Lord let me melt into the beauty,
divine Lord Thou are father and mother to me.
Like a naughty child please forgive my sins and my failings.
Lead me to Your wisdom,
let me bathe in Your purity.
Offer my devotion to You in this
lifetime and others to come.

O Lord let me lie at Your feet with devotion,
bless me as Your devotee evermore.
Oh my Lord Thou can heal my aching heart,
oh Lord let me lie at Your feet for eternity.

- Varsha Sewlal -
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Hari

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The city of Brahman, Chandogya Upanishad
« Reply #1709 on: March 12, 2013, 06:17:32 PM »
The City of Brahman

In the city of Brahman is a secret dwelling, the lotus of the heart. Within this dwelling is a space, and within that space is the fulfillment of our desires. What is within that space should be longed for and realized.
 
As great as the infinite space beyond is the space within the lotus of the heart. Both heaven and earth are contained in that inner space, both fire and air, sun and moon, lightning and stars. Whether we know it in this world or know it not, everything is contained in that inner space.
 
Never fear that old age will invade that city; never fear that this inner treasure of all reality will wither and decay. This knows no age when the body ages; this knows no dying when the body dies. This is the real city of Brahman; this is the Self, free from old age, from death and grief, hunger and thirst. In the Self all desires are fulfilled.
 
The Self desires only what is real, thinks nothing but what is true. Here people do what they are told, becoming dependent on their country, or their piece of land, or the desires of another, so their desires are not fulfilled and their works come to nothing, both in this world and in the next. Those who depart from this world without knowing who they are or what they truly desire have no freedom here or hereafter.
 
But those who leave here knowing who they are and what they truly desire have freedom everywhere, both in this world and in the next.
 
Like strangers in an unfamiliar country walking over a hidden treasure, day by day we enter the world of Brahman while in deep sleep but never find it, carried away by what is false.
 
The Self is hidden in the lotus of the heart. Those who see themselves in all creatures go day by day into the world of Brahman hidden in the heart. Established in peace, they rise above body-consciousness to the supreme light of the Self. Immortal, free from fear, this Self is Brahman, called the True. Beyond the mortal and the immortal, he binds both worlds together. Those who know this live day after day in heaven in this very life.
 
The Self is a bulwark against the confounding of these worlds and a bridge between them. Day and night cannot cross that bridge, nor old age, nor death, nor grief, nor evil or good deeds. All evils turn back there, unable to cross; evil comes not into this world of Brahman.
 
One who crosses by this bridge, therefore, if blind, is blind no more; if hurt, ceases to be hurt; if in sorrow, ceases sorrowing. At this boundary night itself becomes day: night comes not into this world of Brahman.
 
Only those who are pure and self-controlled can find this world of Brahman. That world is theirs alone. In that world, in all the worlds, they live in perfect freedom.
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